Home > Other Health Careers > Medical Equipment Engineers and Technicians

Medical Equipment Engineers and Technicians

By: Ian Murnaghan BSc (hons), MSc - Updated: 3 Jul 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Medical Equipment Engineers Hospitals

If you have already considered the field of engineering, you might want to take some time to think about specialising as a medical equipment engineer or technician. Through a unique combination of biology and medicine, a medical engineer designs and creates special devices to handle medical issues and challenges in the health care field.

While some medical equipment engineers will work in research with various health professionals, others will assess and investigate different systems and products that are used in health care. For instance, a medical engineer might design or improve upon artificial organs or perhaps create a better prosthesis. Medical engineers even work in systems applications, where they may develop more secure or effective information systems such as those used in medicine and health.

Your Education for a Career in Medical Equipment Engineering

To really excel in a career as a medical equipment engineer, you will need at least an undergraduate degree in one of the engineering specialties but you should aim for a graduate degree for the best; salary, job stability and choices for a working environment. Your educational background can involve mechanical engineering or you might prefer the technology field, where you can train in electronics engineering. Not only that, but you will also receive training in the biomedical sciences, which means you will focus on areas such as orthopaedic engineering or biomechanics.

As mentioned, a graduate degree is ideal; in fact, some entry-level engineering positions will require a graduate engineering degree. You will take courses in medicine, computer technology, physics, mathematics and many others. You will also likely have a practical component to put the theoretical learning into practice.

The United Kingdom (UK) has a breadth of choices for engineering courses, particularly those geared to the medical profession, so you should have no difficulty finding options for your studies.

Employment Prospects as a Medical Equipment Engineer or Technician

Biomedical engineering is one of the most rapidly advancing fields in health care right now. Most engineers in the health care field are employed in pharmaceutical and medical manufacturing areas or they work in instrumentation and supplier aspects of health care. Some, however, work in hospitals, particularly those in the area of orthopaedics. There are also engineers who work independently or in research.

As our population ages and the morbidity and mortality from diseases and their complications increases, the demand for better medical equipment and devices is rapidly growing, particularly in hospitals and for home use. Tissue engineering and the use of computers for surgeries means that highly advanced and sophisticated equipment and methods are needed. Biomedical engineers fill the need for effective equipment and programs to improve our health care.

Salaries for medical equipment engineers and technicians vary but technicians work in a more supportive role and will make less than engineers. A biomedical engineer usually makes a minimum of £30,000 but this can climb to substantially more, growing to £50,000 or more each year.

If engineering is an area you enjoy but you also have a passion and interest in medicine, you should think about embarking on a career as a medical equipment engineer or technician. You will have the opportunity to train in a field that brings new, more advanced equipment to help improve and save lives.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
For this purpose I need your help. The only condition of this offer is I have to find the organization that I can pass the training. I would like to know if your company, service department, training department have any possibility of offer me the possibility of training. If you have this possibility, would you be able to help me to give an invitation letter for training. I’m looking forward to hearing from you soon.
Serik - 10-Dec-16 @ 3:25 PM
my name is Loic and i'm currently a third year student in Biomedial enginnering at Middlesex Unniversity london based. i want to become a technician specialised in imaging and so far my course hasn't really been helping me reach myh goal. So here i'm looking for a better formation. can i please have more details on the training you provide ? based on my goal,how long would it take me with your formation?
Loic - 2-Dec-16 @ 3:47 PM
Tooha - Your Question:
Hi, I have graduated from engineering school and i've been awarded a degree in electronics majoring in bio-instrumentation. I've been applying for biomedical engineering jobs since I graduated in 2014 and until now I couldn't get along with any, the reason is because I don't have work experience. I still don't understand how I should get work experience while am still a fresh graduate and nobody is willing to give me a chance to learn and improve myself. I've searched online for internships and apprenticeship in biochemical engineering and am still struggling to find one. I really don't know what to do now, am working part time in a takeaway shop to support myself, and am not sure for how long this situation will last for. I hope that you can give me some guidance how to get involved with this type of work, where should I get some relevant experience to improve myself. thanks

Our Response:
I am sorry to hear this. Many firms offer graduate specialist programmes, which may help you progress without having to have work experience. There are also internships available. However, I imagine you have looked into these. There is more information via the National Careers website, link here which should help point you in the right direction. Wishing you good luck.
AHealthCareer - 1-Oct-15 @ 12:48 PM
Hi, I have graduated from engineering school and i've been awarded a degree in electronics majoring in bio-instrumentation. I've been applying for biomedical engineering jobs since I graduated in 2014 and until now I couldn't get along with any, the reason is because I don't have work experience. I still don't understand how I should get work experience while am still a fresh graduate and nobody is willing to give me a chance to learn and improve myself. I've searched online for internships and apprenticeship in biochemical engineering and am still struggling to find one. I really don't know what to do now, am working part time in a takeaway shop to support myself, and am not sure for how long this situation will last for. I hope that you can give me some guidance how to get involved with this type of work, where should I get some relevant experience to improve myself. thanks
Tooha - 30-Sep-15 @ 2:26 PM
Please want to study Medical equipment engineering as well as technology.
Agbanyopee - 27-Jun-15 @ 1:03 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments